Super-foods with Super-Benefits

“Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy Superfoods and Healthy Skinfood.”

(Hippocrates, the father of modern medicine.)

Two thousand years later, modern medicine changes the perspective to “a pill for every ill”. Where’s food in this equation? Nutritionists try to bring it back as the fundamental of health and insist that most of our health problems can be prevented and why not, alleviated or cured with proper nutrition. This doesn’t equal a load of vitamins in a colorful jar, as nutrients are not only vitamins and minerals, but also include the antioxidants, dietary fiber and enzymes from raw food, which are crucial to the well-being of our body. Nutritionists advise: a 51% raw daily diet would be most appropriate for our bodies.

As far as beauty is concerned, an inclusive approach to skincare teaches us that good health is also reflected on the outside: “looking” healthy is a kind of beauty that no skincare or makeup product can replicate. But in today’s world where stressors and processed foods threaten our health and produce more damage than our body can take, this inclusive approach to skincare seems to be a difficult task.

Super-foods to the rescue! A minimum daily intake can provide our body with a significant amount of necessary nutrients that would make up for the chronic lack from other sources. The “super-food” term has become quite popular in the past few years and has made a huge impact on the diet considerations. Defined as “foods with high phytonutrient content that may confer health benefits”, super-foods are a daily must-have in your meals. We could very well add “beauty benefits” to the health ones.

Which are the best super-foods?

Berries – most of these berries pack more antioxidants, vitamin C and fiber than any other fruit: goji berries, blueberries, raspberries.

Broccoli – always available and one of the best everyday choices. High in vitamin A, C, calcium and fiber. It is of great help in reducing the risk of cancer and heart disease.

Garlic – known to fight cholesterol, it is also our immune-system’s ally because of its antibacterial, antifungal and antiviral properties. Egyptians trusted garlic to give them strength and heal a lot of ailments.

Nuts – nuts and seeds make an excellent source of protein, heart-healthy vitamins and fats. Have a handful with your meals every day: almonds, peanuts, flax seed or pumpkin seed are popular choices.

Spice – cinnamon & turmeric stand out on the spice shelf nowadays and have been proven to help with diverse ailments ever since the ancient times.

Oats – always great for your body because of their high fiber and protein content.

Salmon – rich in Omega-3 fatty acids, this fish leads the battle against heart disease and guarantees our body -and our skin’s!- well-being. Rainbow trout is a great (and tasty) alternative.

Spinach – praised for its high contents of vitamin C. calcium and Iron, spinach is essential for a healthy body.

Mushrooms – often omitted in favor of vegetables and fruit, but they should definitely make the super-food list. The common button mushrooms and any other edible types are great immunity boosters and fight cancer. A significant source of selenium, B-vitamins, magnesium and potassium.

Tomatoes – they are high in lycopene (the bright red pigment called carotene) and are known to fight cancer.

Doctor Murad Article by Howard Murad, M.D., FAAD, a world renowned skincare expert and founder of the Inclusive Health movement. Read more about Dr. Murad.

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Simple suggestions for making good food choices

Looking at the broad sweep of human history, we who are lucky enough to live in the developed world are surrounded by an unprecedented abundance of food and food choices. Freed from the struggle to find enough food to survive in our immediate environment, a struggle that has marked most of human existence, we have the luxury of declining to eat certain foods that our ancestors would have gladly eaten. This freedom from want allows us to make informed choices to improve the nutritional quality of our diet, but it has also fueled the demonization of foods like wheat and dairy that have long been valued as wholesome and the exaltation of foods like kale and quinoa, which have long lingered in comparative dietary obscurity.

This freedom from want allows us to make informed choices to improve the nutritional quality of our diet, but it has also fueled the demonization of foods

So how are we to make the most of our food freedom when we are constantly bombarded with new revelations about heroes and villains lurking in our kitchensonly to have those revelations revealed in turn as the work of publicity seekers pedaling bad science?

Suggestions for making good food choices:

Dont Make Any Sudden Moves

Radical shifts in your diet, or any other aspect of your life, are rarely a great idea. Unless a food or product is the subject of a recall because it is contaminated or unwholesome, you can generally continue to consume it while you are learning more about the pros and cons of including it in your diet.

Consider the Source

This is true both for the source of your food and the source of your information about food. The gold standard for both would be clean and ethically produced. If food is sourced from someplace where agricultural products are not inspected, there are no restrictions on the use of pesticides, and working conditions are unsafe and unsanitary, you probably shouldn’t consume it. Similarly, if food “science” comes from a ”dirty” source with an economic or political interest in the “story”, you probably shouldn’t consume it either. While no single source of information is entirely reliable, the editorial standards for publication in established medical journals are fairly high and provide some level of screening to help filter out some of the junk science.

Look for Corroboration

Real science takes time and generates results that can be repeated. A tremendous amount of research and peer review of that research is needed to start to tease out the truth about any subject. Many of the tantalizing or horrifying food stories that we read, especially those stories that bubble up in the unedited wilderness of the Internet, are based upon things suggested by early findings and small studies.

Listen to Your Body and Your Doctor

Trust your experience. If something hasn’t bothered you in the past, it probably isn’t going to be a problem in the short term while you are deciding whether it is a good choice for you. Dont forget that you are uniquefrom your smile to the curves of your digestive tract. If your best friend is one of the very small number of people who cannot tolerate gluten, that doesn’t mean your health will improve if you eliminate certain grains from your diet. But if you are experiencing some symptoms of a food allergy or intolerance, most often digestive and dermatological issues, it is important to talk to your doctor about how to identify a problem food and eliminate it from your diet.

Miracle Foods

Goji berries? Acai berries? Coconut water? Kale? Each of these foods is wonderful in its own way, but there are no magic berries, leaves, teas or juices that will change your life. All plant-based foods, in their whole, natural, unprocessed state, are truly miracle foods packed with antioxidants, vitamins and other healthful phytochemicals. Enjoy them in as fresh and unprocessed a state as you can, and enjoy them as a diverse assortment. Humans have evolved to be quite successful as omnivores, and we thrive on a varied diet. Dietary diversity really is key, because when it comes to foods, we really can have too much of a good thing and the current kale craze provides an excellent example. Doctors are seeing people in their offices with digestive issues and symptoms of severe thyroid gland suppression as a result of obsessive over-consumption of kale.

Savor the Flavors of Life

No matter what food choices you make, don’t let food be one more source of stress and anxiety. Try to follow a simple 80/20 strategy to build the bulk of your diet; 80%, from whole foods with a special emphasis on colorful, water-rich fruits and vegetables and 20% from foods that you love, regardless of their inherent healthfulness. Sharing foods you love with those you love will give a bigger boost to the health of your heart than you’ll ever get from a bowl of chia seeds.

Doctor Murad Article by Howard Murad, M.D., FAAD, a world renowned skincare expert and founder of the Inclusive Health movement. Read more about Dr. Murad.

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Collagen Building Foods

Collagen is the foundation of healthy skin. It provides the natural support structure that gives skin strength and resilience. It helps our lips stay plump and prevents our cheeks from drooping into jowls. However, as we age, our body’s natural production of collagen decreases. Generally, the first signs of age-related collagen loss are fine lines, which can develop into wrinkles over time. Both men and women lose about one percent of their collagen per year after their 30th birthday. For women, however, this loss of collagen escalates significantly in the first five years after menopause.

To help combat this decline, here are nine collagen-boosting foods you can easily incorporate into your daily diet:

  1. Fish

    Omega-3 fatty acids create an ideal environment for collagen production. Find this nutrient in fish such as salmon and black cod.

  2. Prunes

    As free radicals attack the skin, they break down collagen. To combat free radical damage, eat antioxidant rich prunes. Eat five to six prunes daily for a great health boost.

  3. Manuka Honey

    This special honey from New Zealand has long been promoted for its special healing properties. Manuka Honey has been touted as helpful in the formation of strong collagen. Additionally, it is rich in antioxidants and has been traditionally used to help to reduce inflammation and breakouts.

  4. Pineapple

    Your body needs an ample amount of the mineral manganese for collagen production, especially when healing wounds. Pineapple is high in manganese and can help you achieve the recommended daily amount of 2.3 milligrams per day.

  5. Turkey

    Turkey contains carnosine, which research suggests may slow down the collagen damaging aging process called cross-linking. Cross-linking makes collagen stiff and less resilient. Eat turkey two to three times a week to help your skin snap back into shape.

  6. Oranges

    Your body uses Vitamin C to make collagen and elastin, proteins that help keep your skin firm. Get 75 – 90 milligrams of vitamin c daily for ideal collagen production.

  7. Grapefruit

    After age 50, it is recommended that you concentrate on a variety of fruits and vegetables to boost your vitamin c intake. Grapefruit is a great vitamin c-rich alternative to oranges.

  8. Shellfish

    Shellfish contains a concentrated amount of copper, an essential mineral the body uses to bind collagen and elastin for strong, healthy skin. Consume 0.9 milligram of copper a day to help boost healthy collagen and elastin production.

  9. Tomatoes, pepper and beets.

    These red foods are an excellent source of lycopene, an antioxidant that boost skin’s own natural sun protection to help prevent collagen damage resulting from UV exposure.

While the body is constantly producing new collagen, since that production naturally decreases with age, adding collagen-boosting foods to your diet is a great way to encourage your body to produce as much as it can, no matter what your age.

It’s a smart step that can help keep skin healthy and supple.

Article by Howard Murad, M.D., FAAD, a world renowned skincare expert and founder of the Inclusive Health movement. Learn more about Dr. Murad.

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How to Take Care of Yourself

BL15_603-Howtotakecareofyourself

At the end of the workday, are you going out for drinks or off to yoga? Will dinner be steak or salmon? Countless studies have demonstrated that the lifestyle choices we make have a significant influence on both the length and the quality of our lives. Everyone has heard the endless messages telling us to eat better, sleep better and get more exercise, yet statistics show that only a small percentage of us manage to follow most programs in the long term.

So why don’t we all do the right thing and take better care of ourselves? A recent article by Jane E. Brody, for the New York Times, Rethinking Exercise as a Source of Immediate Rewards, revisits some very interesting research on motivation by Dr. Michelle Segar who directs the Sport, Health and Activity Research and Policy Center at the University of Michigan. Dr. Segar has concluded that most people fail at programs that are built around long-term goals like weight loss. Surprisingly, people on these kinds of goal-focused programs actually spend less time exercising. The people who do exercise regularly are the people who find immediate rewards from exercise. Exercise is immediately relevant to them because they enjoy the activity or they enjoy the way the feel physically and/or psychologically when they make exercise a part of their day. Naturally, they achieve long-term benefits from the activity, but those are almost seen as a bonus or a byproduct of the activity that gives people pleasure, revitalization or perhaps even a sense of daily accomplishment.

I’ve seen the same results play out with people who have come to embrace Inclusive Health® as a gentle structure around which to shape a true wellness lifestyle. Each of the three facets of Inclusive Health, Looking Better, Living Better and Feeling Better, offers immediate rewards as well as long-term benefits.   When we give our skin the daily attention it deserves, as our largest and most connected organ, we Look Better immediately. Fast results help reinforce our adherence to our skincare routine, and we receive “secondary” rewards in the form of better long-term skin health and better appearance, since skin looks younger longer. Living Better, by making good food choices and using dietary supplements, gives us immediate rewards as we discover the pleasure of eating well; short-term rewards as we start to sleep better and have better digestive health; and long-term rewards such as better management of weight, blood pressure, blood sugars and inflammation. Feeling Better, by valuing ourselves and finding ways to maximize our happiness, rewards us in the short term as we make time to do the things we love, and in the long term by helping us to resist and recover from the toll on the body and mind that the Cultural Stress® of a 24/7, plugged-in lifestyle can take.

If you focus on the daily return on your investment of time and energy, you’ll discover that following the guidance of Inclusive Health to find true wellness isn’t a duty that requires discipline—it’s a journey that yields endless rewards.

 

Doctor Murad Article by Howard Murad, M.D., FAAD, a world renowned skincare expert and founder of the Inclusive Health movement. Read more about Dr. Murad.

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Foods, Fads and Facts. What’s Right for You?

BL15_646-FoodsFadsFactsDrMurad

Looking at the broad sweep of human history, we who are lucky enough to live in the developed world are surrounded by an unprecedented abundance of food and food choices. Freed from the struggle to find enough food to survive in our immediate environment, a struggle that has marked most of human existence, we have the luxury of declining to eat certain foods that our ancestors would have gladly eaten. This freedom from want allows us to make informed choices to improve the nutritional quality of our diet, but it has also fueled the demonization of foods like wheat and dairy that have long been valued as wholesome and the exaltation of foods like kale and quinoa, which have long lingered in comparative dietary obscurity.

So how are we to make the most of our food freedom when we are constantly bombarded with new revelations about heroes and villains lurking in our kitchens—only to have those revelations revealed in turn as the work of publicity seekers pedaling bad science?

Here are a few simple suggestions for making good food choices.

Don’t Make Any Sudden Moves
Radical shifts in your diet, or any other aspect of your life, are rarely a great idea. Unless a food or product is the subject of a recall because it is contaminated or unwholesome, you can generally continue to consume it while you are learning more about the pros and cons of including it in your diet.

Consider the Source
This is true both for the source of your food and the source of your information about food. The gold standard for both would be clean and ethically produced. If food is sourced from someplace where agricultural products are not inspected, there are no restrictions on the use of pesticides, and working conditions are unsafe and unsanitary, you probably shouldn’t consume it. Similarly, if food “science” comes from a “dirty” source with an economic or political interest in the “story,” you probably shouldn’t consume it either. While no single source of information is entirely reliable, the editorial standards for publication in established medical journals are fairly high and provide some level of screening to help filter out some of the junk science.

Look for Corroboration
Real science takes time—and generates results that can be repeated. A tremendous amount of research and peer review of that research is needed to start to tease out the truth about any subject. Many of the tantalizing or horrifying food stories that we read, especially those stories that bubble up in the unedited wilderness of the Internet, are based upon things suggested by early findings and small studies.

“Listen” to Your Body—and Your Doctor
Trust your experience. If something hasn’t bothered you in the past, it probably isn’t going to be a problem in the short term while you are deciding whether it is a good choice for you. Don’t forget that you are unique—from your smile to the curves of your digestive tract. If your best friend is one of the very small number of people who cannot tolerate gluten, that doesn’t mean your health will improve if you eliminate certain grains from your diet. But if you are experiencing some symptoms of a food allergy or intolerance, most often digestive and dermatological issues, it is important to talk to your doctor about how to identify a problem food and eliminate it from your diet.

Miracle Foods
Goji berries? Acai berries? Coconut water? Kale? Each of these foods is wonderful in its own way, but there are no magic berries, leaves, teas or juices that will change your life. All plant-based foods, in their whole, natural, unprocessed state, are truly miracle foods packed with antioxidants, vitamins and other healthful phytochemicals. Enjoy them in as fresh and unprocessed a state as you can, and enjoy them as a diverse assortment. Humans have evolved to be quite successful as omnivores, and we thrive on a varied diet. Dietary diversity really is key, because when it comes to foods, we really can have too much of a good thing—and the current kale craze provides an excellent example. Doctors are seeing people in their offices with digestive issues and symptoms of severe thyroid gland suppression as a result of obsessive over-consumption of kale.

Savor the Flavors of Life
No matter what food choices you make, don’t let food be one more source of stress and anxiety. Try to follow a simple 80/20 strategy to build the bulk of your diet; 80%, from whole foods with a special emphasis on colorful, water-rich fruits and vegetables and 20% from foods that you love, regardless of their inherent healthfulness. Sharing foods you love with those you love will give a bigger boost to the health of your heart than you’ll ever get from a bowl of chia seeds.

 

Doctor Murad Article by Howard Murad, M.D., FAAD, a world renowned skincare expert and founder of the Inclusive Health movement. Read more about Dr. Murad.

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Healthy Skin From the Inside Out

Healthy skin is a reflection of overall health and well-being. Good skincare practices consist of a double approach, internal and topical. Internal skincare is caring for your skin from the inside, by eating a balanced diet, full of beautifying nutrients, providing proper hydration and maintaining low stress levels. Topical skincare is caring for your skin from the outside by helping the epidermis stay strong and healthy. Sunscreen, creams, cleansers, and various treatments are necessary topical solutions for skin.

The inside-out approach to skincare can be summarized by a few basic rules and habits one must follow as part of the daily skincare routine.

    Internally:

    left1

  • Eat a nutritious breakfast and include cereal, fiber-rich foods and probiotic yogurt. Fiber and probiotics help clean your intestines of toxins which can cause skin problems like acne, dermatitis, or irritation and sensitivity.
  • Integrate leafy greens, vegetables and fruits in you diet with every meal. Minerals like Zinc and Selenium are crucial in skin regeneration, anti-oxidants fight free radical damage at cellular level, vitamins nourish the skin from the inside making it radiant and healthy-looking. Tip: add spinach and other greens to your omelettes, sandwiches and salads.
  • Eat ‘good fats’ like Omega 3 and Omega 6 every day to maintain cellular integrity and help maintain skin hydrated from the bottom layers. If cells are optimally hydrated, they are stronger and healthier.
  • Be wise about losing weight. If you plan a diet, make sure you’re not excluding vital nutrients from your meals and exercise to keep your body toned and maintain optimal hydration levels in your muscles. Weight loss usually depletes your body of extra water in your tissues making skin appear saggy, while fat loss makes your skin appear older with visible wrinkles.
  • Don’t forget exercise! Even if you don’t exercise for a dream body, exercising improves blood circulation and skin appearance. Moderate exercise like an hour of walk every day could do wonders for your entire body and your skin.
  • Take time to relax and do a little something you love every day: sleep an extra 10 minutes in the morning, read, go to a spa, or meet your friends. Maintaining low stress levels helps skin stay healthy and wrinkle-free.

 

    Topically:

    right2

  • Use sunscreen every day. Ultra Violet (UV) light in excess damages skin tissue and causes skin aging. Use a minimum SPF15 all over your body every day and reapply a few times when you’re outside on sunny days.
  • Cleanse twice a day. It is imperative to cleanse your face in the morning before applying moisturizers or makeup and in the evening before going to bed. This prevents acne flare-ups, inflammations, and helps moisturizers and treatments penetrate pores better. A clean face at night allows skin to regenerate and build new healthy cells.
  • Exfoliate! The older you get, skin regenerates slower. Help your skin with AHA & BHA peels or gentle scrubs a few times a week. On your body, use a moisturizing scrub or use a loofah while you shower.
  • Moisturize – hydration is essential for supple and healthy skin. Maintain optimal hydration levels with proper nutrition but help your skin stay protected by supplementing moisture with creams and lotions. Even oily skin needs hydration in order to balance the production of sebum; oiliness is often a sign of dehydration – when skin doesn’t have sufficient moisture, it compensates by producing more oil. Keep oil at bay by moisturizing, it will help skin regenerate and stay healthy.

Internal skincare supports topical skincare. The two combined significantly improve the quality of skin and maintain its youthfulness. While cleansing and moisturizing skin is important for everyday care, nourishing and hydrating from the inside with proper nutrients is vital for overall health and improves skin quality in the long term.

 

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Health Benefits of Watermelon

Benefits of Watermelon

The sound of a knife slicing open a crisp, vibrant, green watermelon rind is one of the signals that summer is here. There are few more perfect representations of everything we love about summer than the cool, refreshing watermelon. Another reason to appreciate this amazing fruit is the lesser-known nutrients that are packed into its brightly colored interior.

The high concentrations of water in this delicious melon have made it a favorite summer snack for generations to thirsty adults and children. And many may be surprised to also know that watermelons are filled with Vitamin C, an important free-radical fighting antioxidant.

The pulp of the watermelon also contains lycopene, giving it that deep pinkish-red color and antioxidant properties. Lycopene is believed to help guard against heart disease, and it may help lower the risk of prostate cancer, among other cancers. The green rind of the watermelon is full of citrulline amino acid and can improve blood circulation by dilating the blood vessels.

There are numerous creative ways to enjoy watermelon as well. Try pureeing the watermelon with its rind. Add lime, basil and iced tea for a refreshing drink on a hot summer day. This way you are not only getting the nutrition from the pulp, but also from the rind. Another one my favorite ways to spice up an ordinary slice of watermelon is to chill it, then add a sprinkle of fresh mint and lime juice. It gives this refreshing summer snack a new twist

In many cultures, it is a social custom to bring a watermelon to a host’s home as a gift. So, consider giving the gift of good health this summer with a watermelon!

Article by Howard Murad, M.D., FAAD, a world renowned skincare expert and founder of the Inclusive Health movement.

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Sources: Natural News, Real Simple

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Before Medicine There Was Food

BL15_542-DrMBforeMedsFood

In today’s society, we are led to believe that the solution to virtually every problem in our lives—from health to happiness—is a pill. While many of those pills contain life-saving medicines that are evidence of the true power of science, many aspects of our lives can actually be improved by following the wisdom of our ancestors and taking advantage of health-boosting fruits and vegetables. That’s why I often tell my patients to remember, “Before there was medicine there was food.”

Since May is National Skin Cancer Awareness Month, it’s a great time to try to add foods to your diet that help boost your skin’s natural ability to protect itself from sun damage. Foods like broccoli and pomegranate are rich in compounds that have been shown to improve the protective performance of topical sunscreens. I call this approach eating your sunscreen.

Our digestive health is an area where good food choices can provide benefits that medicine simply can’t. A diet that is high in both soluble and insoluble plant fiber will help to absorb cholesterol and help to create the kind of environment that allows your gut flora to flourish. Your gut flora is made up of the good bacteria that help you digest your food and avoid irregularity. It also contributes to your overall immune system health. And, of course, treating yourself to a wonderful salad for lunch or dinner is a much nicer option than a daily dose of Milk of Magnesia.

Even the traditional practice of marinating meats in cooking herbs and spices—like garlic, pepper, thyme, rosemary and sage—helps to eliminate certain potentially harmful pathogens. And let’s not forget chocolate. The antioxidants in this sweet treat are now being investigated as agents to help stave off heart, brain and vascular diseases, including dementia and Alzheimer’s.

I encourage you to spend some time getting to know the “medicines” available in the produce aisle of your local market. Your body, spirit and bank account may all be the better for it.
Article by Dr. Howard Murad

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10 Best Foods to Fight Aging

Food to Fight Aging
 
Beautiful skin starts with your diet. A well-balanced diet can not only help you live longer and feel better, it can also help you look younger. Topical anti-aging treatments can only go so far. But, you can fight aging from the inside out by eating foods rich in antioxidants, which slow down the signs of aging by fighting against free radical damage. Turn back the clock with these 10 delicious anti-aging foods:

1. Pomegranates

This fruit is packed with vitamin C, which helps guard against the wrinkling effects of sun damage. The juice in pomegranate seeds contains both ellagic acid and punicalagin. The first is a polyphenol compound that fights damage from free radicals; the second is a super-nutrient that may increase your body’s capacity to preserve collagen.

2. Blueberries

These delicious berries contain more antioxidants than almost any other food! They can give your skin extra protection against the skin-damaging free radicals that result from sun exposure and emotional stress. Just half-a-cup every day will help to prevent the cell-structure damage that can lead to loss of firmness, fine lines, and wrinkles.

3. Spinach

This vital veggie contains special phytonutrients, or antioxidant compounds, that help guard against damage caused by the sun. Spinach is loaded with beta-carotene and lutein, two nutrients that have been shown to improve skin’s firmness and elasticity.

4. Cold Water Fish

Sardines, salmon, and mackerel contain omega-3 fatty acids, which strengthen skin-cell membranes, helping keep moisture in. Consuming two servings of fish a week can reduce chronic skin inflammations, like eczema and psoriasis.

5. Tomatoes

They are so much more than a pretty salad topping! Tomatoes are packed with vitamin C, which helps build collagen, resulting in firmer, plumper-looking skin. Tomatoes also contain lycopene, which helps protect your skin from UV damage and play an important role in improving your cardiovascular health.

6. Watermelon

This refreshing, sweet treat contains everybody’s favorite antioxidant, vitamin C—plus lycopene and potassium—which regulate the balance of water and nutrients in cells.

7. Cucumber

These are very hydrating vegetables, and staying hydrated is one way to stay looking and feeling young. The silica in the peel helps promote collagen production. Buy them unwaxed if possible.

8. Brazil Nuts

Selenium, a powerful mineral that aids in the production of the anti-aging antioxidant glutathione, can be found in Brazil nuts. This mineral repairs cell damage, and protects your skin from free radical damage. . According to a recent study in New Zealand, just two nuts a day can help you consume necessary amount of selenium for powerful antioxidant protection.

9. Avocado

Like nuts and fish, avocados have a lot of good-for-you (and your skin) fats, but they are also high in glutathione (like Brazil nuts), which helps fight aging process. Avocados are also one of the richest sources of monounsaturated fats and contain biotin and oleic acid for healthy skin.

10. Green Tea

This healthy brew contains catechins (one of the most effective compounds for preventing sun damage like hyperpigmentation) and polyphenols (antioxidants that combat free-radical damage and may reverse the effects of aging). Green tea also contains the amino acid L-Theanine, which induces calming effect and promotes relaxation..
 
These healthy and delicious foods give us numerous benefits, including sun protection and anti-aging properties, helping us to eat our way to health that’s #BetterEveryDay.
 
Sources:
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/12/11/anti-aging-foods_n_4419906.html
http://www.doctoroz.com/slideshow/anti-aging-foods-gallery
http://www.fitnessmagazine.com/beauty/skin-care/anti-aging/the-best-anti-aging-foods-/

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Inclusive Health Grocery Shopping Tips

Grocery Shopping Tips

 

Part of the Inclusive Health® lifestyle that encourages cells to act younger is the choices we make regarding the foods we eat. Beautiful skin—and a healthy body overall—starts with the water we carry in every cell in our bodies.

Pitcher of Health
To help people visualize what healthy eating should look like, I created what I call the “Pitcher of Health.” By following this simple eating guideline, you can help strengthen your cells, increase your cellular water and get the nutrients you need for a healthy and happy life. This is in no way a strict or “fad” diet. On the contrary, it is a recommendation that will help you design your own blueprint for a healthy eating strategy.

A key aspect to think about as you look at the Pitcher of Health is to consider these guidelines as part of what I call the “80/20” rule. The food you eat should consist of roughly 80%  great, healthy nutritious foods, while the remaining 20% or so can be comfort foods. I’m a strong believer in this philosophy because those who stick to an all-healthy diet tend to end up craving the less healthy, but enjoyable foods all the time. If you never allow yourself the joy to experience your favorite treats in moderation, eating can become a chore and the tendency to binge eat will be much greater.

Grocery List
To get you started, below is a Pitcher of Health-inspired sample grocery list that I’ve filled with some of my own favorite foods. Remember that these are just suggestions, and you should feel free to substitute similar foods you enjoy if there are items on the list you personally don’t like or are allergic to.

Fruit (3+ Servings):

  • Dried goji berries
  • Bananas
  • Organic apples
  • Blueberries
  • Pomegranate
  • Watermelon

Vegetables (5+ Servings):

  • Broccoli
  • Kale
  • Tomatoes
  • Spinach
  • Cucumber
  • Brussels sprouts

Whole Grains (4 – 8 Servings)

  • Whole wheat bread
  • Whole wheat pasta
  • Oats and oatmeal
  • Quinoa
  • Buckwheat

Lean Protein (4 – 6 Servings)

  • Chicken breasts
  • Edamame
  • Greek yogurt
  • Eggs
  • Tilapia

Fats (3 – 4 Servings)

  • Nuts (walnuts, almonds, cashews, pecans, etc.)
  • Extra virgin olive oil
  • Wild salmon
  • Avocado
  • Flaxseed

Supplements

  • Multivitamin
  • Essential fatty acids

Treat

  • Frozen yogurt
  • A bar of dark chocolate
  • Yogurt parfait

Making Inclusive Health changes to your diet is likely easier than you think. By merely making slight shifts in what you pick up at the grocery store, you can learn a way of eating–and living—that’s sustainable and healthy for you and your family.

If you liked this post, you will also like: The Science of Cellular Water Explained


Doctor Murad

 Article by Howard Murad, M.D., FAAD, a world renowned skincare expert and founder of the Inclusive Health movement. Read more about Dr. Murad.

 

 

 


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