How sunscreen protects

Sunscreens protect your skin by blocking or absorbing the sun’s rays. Depending on the active ingredients in the sunscreen you use, you will protect yourself from the burning ultraviolet B (UVB) rays and the more penetrating ultraviolet A (UVA) rays.

The growing awareness of UVA’s destructive power is especially disturbing because since sunscreens were invented we have has the ability to protect ourselves against the burning UVB rays. That, obviously is a good thing. However, the downside is that since we’re less likely to burn, there is no warning sign that we’ve gotten too much sun. We could stay at the beach or on the golf course much longer than we might have in the days before sunscreens, exposing our skin to huge doses of UVA. Today we have broad-spectrum sunscreens that protect against both UVA and UVB rays.

Tip: Always wear a moisturizer with SPF.

What are the side effects of sun damage?

Dr. Murad explains.

 

Doctor Murad Article by Howard Murad, M.D., FAAD, a world renowned skincare expert and founder of the Inclusive Health movement. Read more about Dr. Murad.

Read More

Free to Be Happy and Healthy

Summer is traditionally a time to celebrate freedom. People all throughout the Northern Hemisphere feel a spirit of freedom in the air throughout the summer months. The combination of warmer temperatures, extra hours of daylight, lighter work schedules and a recess for most schools gives us freedom to explore new places and new possibilities for personal growth. And it’s not surprising if you feel healthier and happier in this season of freedom—most people do.

What you may not realize is that there are real and tangible psychological and physiological factors which feed the summer boost to our mood. Extra summer daylight and the brighter quality of that summer light both have a direct effect on the production of hormones that regulate our moods and our waking and sleeping cycles. This hormonal effect may be part of the reason people report fewer episodes of depression during the summer months. The free time that comes with extra daylight hours and lighter summer schedules also gives us an opportunity to relax and have some “me time” to try and recover from the chronic Cultural Stress® that can burden us and erode our health and sense of well-being.

I strongly encourage you to make the most of this opportunity to unwind by truly unplugging, at home and on vacation. I also encourage you to heal your spirit and body by behaving like a child during your free time by letting go of unreasonable expectations and negative thinking. And if you are planning to take a family vacation, please take to heart the following advice “be imperfect; live longer.” Don’t fall into the trap of pressuring yourself to deliver an ultimate vacation experience for the whole family. Try not to over-plan and try to let everyone have an age-appropriate amount of input—it will be less stressful for all concerned if the agenda represents a family collaboration instead of a parental imposition. I hope you have a wonderful summer with many memorable moments and that the health and happiness you rediscover this summer will stay with you throughout the year.

 

Doctor Murad Article by Howard Murad, M.D., FAAD, a world renowned skincare expert and founder of the Inclusive Health movement. Read more about Dr. Murad.

Read More

Adventures in Good Health

We’ve all heard the ancient maxim, “travel is broadening.” New places, faces and foods certainly stimulate our senses, and there is nothing like looking at the local newspaper while you visiting a new city to help shake off that home-centric perspective.

But I believe the benefits of travel are more than just intellectual. I think there can be emotional benefits as well. For example, while there may be certain stressful challenges involved in travel, it’s a healthy stress that actually energizes you to help you focus on overcoming obstacles. Each little challenge you meet, from finding your way to your hotel to ordering off the menu in a foreign language, gives you a wonderful sense of accomplishment. It’s why travel stress is really the opposite of unhealthy, chronic Cultural Stress®, which keeps you constantly overstimulated, taxes every system in your body, robs you of productive energy and makes it hard to focus.

To make sure that you get the most out of your travels, remember that a vacation from your ordinary work, school or home duties shouldn’t mean a vacation from healthy habits you practice as part of an Inclusive Health® lifestyle. Plan for your travels with TSA-approved sizes of your favorite skincare products, including a strong SPF for your day tours, to make sure you look your healthy best. Be mindful of your food choices so that your body has high-quality nutrition, which is the key to living well. Last but not least, try not to over-plan so that you have enough time to take care of yourself and get the sleep you need to feel better and see the world with fresh eyes every day.

One last tip—keep your hands away from your nose, eyes and mouth. The same simple protocols that can help keep you safe at home during cold and flu season can help you on the road. Airplanes, airports, trains, cabs, elevator and ATM buttons, even restaurant menus are common collection points for the sorts of organisms that can ruin your trip.

 

Doctor Murad Article by Howard Murad, M.D., FAAD, a world renowned skincare expert and founder of the Inclusive Health movement. Read more about Dr. Murad.

Read More

Nature’s High-Performance Moisturizer: Hyaluronic Acid

Regardless of your skin type, once you reach adulthood, your skin becomes a little drier every day. How you respond to that loss of moisture may be the single most important factor in determining how old you look. For people with skin that is naturally less oily, dry-skin-related issues are often apparent at an early age. They can begin to experience symptoms such as dullness, rough texture, flaking, cracking and tightness as early as their 20s. People with more oily skin tend to see different symptoms of water loss and see them a bit later, typically in their 30s or 40s. Common symptoms include fine lines, wrinkles and loss of volume. But no matter when you begin to see signs of persistent dehydration, restoring lost water is a central component in any anti-aging skincare program. Fortunately, there are some amazing super-hydrators available to help you to replenish your skin.

Moisturizers help to renew skin with 3 classes of ingredients: water, hydrophobic agents that seal water into the skin’s surface, and hydrophilic agents (also known as humectants) that attract water and create a reservoir within the skin to help keep moisture at an optimal level. One of the most important humectants in high-performance skincare is Hyaluronic Acid, a long, elastic molecule that is naturally abundant in young skin. Hyaluronic Acid is a component of the natural moisturizing factor (NMF), the water-soluble compounds responsible for the wettability, water-holding and absorbing powers of the skin’s surface. It also plays an important role deep within the skin and throughout the body where it binds with water to form a slippery gel that provides cushioning and lubrication. It is part of the synovial fluid that keeps our joints comfortable, and it also forms part of the intercellular matrix—the watery medium between cells through which nutrients and cellular waste products flow. Because each molecule of Hyaluronic Acid can hold up to 1,000 times its weight in water, it allows topical moisturizers to provide the sustained supply of water needed to keep skin plump, smooth and well hydrated.

In addition to the ability to enhance the moisturizing power of topical skincare, the natural plumping properties of Hyaluronic Acid have also made it a popular ingredient for injectable wrinkle fillers. New Hyaluronic filling sphere technologies, however, now give topical anti-aging moisture formulas the power to deliver results comparable to injections.

Beyond its remarkable power as a topical hydrator, Hyaluronic Acid is also used to give skin an exceptionally beautiful finish—what skincare chemists call the “after feel.” If you are looking to take your anti-aging hydration strategy to the next level, be sure that the moisturizer you select includes this remarkable substance.

Doctor Murad Article by Howard Murad, M.D., FAAD, a world renowned skincare expert and founder of the Inclusive Health movement. Read more about Dr. Murad.

Read More

How to Take Care of Yourself

BL15_603-Howtotakecareofyourself

At the end of the workday, are you going out for drinks or off to yoga? Will dinner be steak or salmon? Countless studies have demonstrated that the lifestyle choices we make have a significant influence on both the length and the quality of our lives. Everyone has heard the endless messages telling us to eat better, sleep better and get more exercise, yet statistics show that only a small percentage of us manage to follow most programs in the long term.

So why don’t we all do the right thing and take better care of ourselves? A recent article by Jane E. Brody, for the New York Times, Rethinking Exercise as a Source of Immediate Rewards, revisits some very interesting research on motivation by Dr. Michelle Segar who directs the Sport, Health and Activity Research and Policy Center at the University of Michigan. Dr. Segar has concluded that most people fail at programs that are built around long-term goals like weight loss. Surprisingly, people on these kinds of goal-focused programs actually spend less time exercising. The people who do exercise regularly are the people who find immediate rewards from exercise. Exercise is immediately relevant to them because they enjoy the activity or they enjoy the way the feel physically and/or psychologically when they make exercise a part of their day. Naturally, they achieve long-term benefits from the activity, but those are almost seen as a bonus or a byproduct of the activity that gives people pleasure, revitalization or perhaps even a sense of daily accomplishment.

I’ve seen the same results play out with people who have come to embrace Inclusive Health® as a gentle structure around which to shape a true wellness lifestyle. Each of the three facets of Inclusive Health, Looking Better, Living Better and Feeling Better, offers immediate rewards as well as long-term benefits.   When we give our skin the daily attention it deserves, as our largest and most connected organ, we Look Better immediately. Fast results help reinforce our adherence to our skincare routine, and we receive “secondary” rewards in the form of better long-term skin health and better appearance, since skin looks younger longer. Living Better, by making good food choices and using dietary supplements, gives us immediate rewards as we discover the pleasure of eating well; short-term rewards as we start to sleep better and have better digestive health; and long-term rewards such as better management of weight, blood pressure, blood sugars and inflammation. Feeling Better, by valuing ourselves and finding ways to maximize our happiness, rewards us in the short term as we make time to do the things we love, and in the long term by helping us to resist and recover from the toll on the body and mind that the Cultural Stress® of a 24/7, plugged-in lifestyle can take.

If you focus on the daily return on your investment of time and energy, you’ll discover that following the guidance of Inclusive Health to find true wellness isn’t a duty that requires discipline—it’s a journey that yields endless rewards.

 

Doctor Murad Article by Howard Murad, M.D., FAAD, a world renowned skincare expert and founder of the Inclusive Health movement. Read more about Dr. Murad.

Read More

Dr. Murad will become the first skin care professional to be honored with the Legacy award

On Saturday, March 12, 2016, the Beauty Changes Lives Foundation (BCL) in partnership with America’s Beauty Show by Cosmetologists Chicago and Pivot Point will present the 4th Annual BCL Experience at Soldier Field, Chicago. A highlight of the evening will be an elegant dinner paying tribute to Dr. Howard Murad.

What began as a fundraiser celebrating beauty and wellness education has evolved into a philanthropic movement uniting industry leaders, beauty and wellness professionals and NEXTGEN talent. On Saturday, March 12, 2016, the Beauty Changes Lives Foundation (BCL) in partnership with America’s Beauty Show by Cosmetologists Chicago and Pivot Point will present the 4th Annual BCL Experience at Soldier Field, Chicago. The immersive, experiential evening will bring together beauty and wellness professionals to celebrate the industry’s spirit of creativity, lifelong learning and commitment to nurturing NEXTGEN professionals while raising funds for beauty and wellness scholarships administered by the Beauty Changes Lives Foundation.

 

Legacy award honors a legend in skincare, Howard Murad, M.D. A highlight of the evening will be an elegant dinner paying tribute to Dr. Howard Murad, the 2016 Legacy award recipient. The founder of Murad, LLC and a pioneer in creating the inclusive health movement, Dr. Murad will become the first skin care professional to be honored with the Legacy award. Previous award recipients include Vidal Sassoon (presented posthumously in 2012), Tippi Hedren (2013), and Leo Passage (presented posthumously in 2015). Dr. Murad is a long-time supporter of the Beauty Changes Lives Foundation, and Murad, LLC sponsored the first BCL scholarship exclusively for skin care professionals. “I am extremely honored to be this year’s recipient of the Beauty Changes Lives Legacy Award. Beauty Changes Lives is such a wonderful organization and, on behalf of everyone at Murad, I would like to say we are proud to support such an important mission. ”

Read to read the full article

Source: PR Web

Read More

The Power of Pomegranate

BL14_343-NPDPores

 

Pomegranate contains a super antioxidant called ellagic acid, which is even more powerful that the antioxidants in green tea. Pomegranate appears to be effective against viruses, destroying them on contact. And it is especially effective in protecting cells from free radical damage.

Other compounds in pomegranate –the anthocyanidins –interact with ellagic acid to further boost its antioxidant potency. The powerful antioxidants in pomegranate work by boosting the levels of glutathione, a natural antioxidant in the body that helps protect the DNA in cells from free radical damage. Glutathione is also essential in helping the body recycle hormones such as estrogen, which also protect the skin cells.

Spring Cleansers Hydrators

Most Murad products contain antioxidants and are essential ingredients to receive the best results. Now you know why!

Doctor Murad Article by Howard Murad, M.D., FAAD, a world renowned skincare expert and founder of the Inclusive Health movement. Read more about Dr. Murad.

Read More

Not All Aging Is the Same

BL15_610-WhatisEssenceSkincarev2

There’s only one word to describe what happens over time –age –but there are different reasons and triggers for this process. Let’s look at the three main types of aging. This will help you to completely grasp how to address aging.

What happens when you age?

  • Wrinkles
  • Sun damage
  • Less hair in some places, more in others
  • Poor memory
  • Lack of sleep
  • Lack of Energy
  • Poor digestion
  • Reduced circulation
  • Chronic disease

Intrinsic Aging: A Fact of Life

Intrinsic aging is simply the natural aging process no matter what you do to try to halt it. It’s what would occur had you never been in the sun, swallowed toxins, taken a stressful exam, smoked a cigarette, partied past your bedtime, breathed metropolitan air, and so on. It’s what would occur despite sleeping in a pure oxygen tank, avoiding smiling to defy laugh lines, or Botoxing your face stone cold. 12139807_318783148292334_76868710_nGenetics play a key role in intrinsic aging. If your parents aged well, odds are you will too. In the body, intrinsic aging results in loss of collagen and elastin, and reduced water content in the cells.

Environmental Aging: Inevitable but Controllable

Extrinsic or Environmental aging is exactly what it sounds like: aging from a combination of injury to your outsides and compromised cellular functions on your insides. Luckily, this is a type of aging that we can control to come degree. Factors such as excessive sun exposure, pollution, smoking, stress, poor diet, and intake of drugs or alcohol contribute to this type of aging. The classic signs of environmentally aging are usually written all over a person’s skin in the form of redness, dryness, thinner skin, sagging, wrinkles and hyperpigmentation. You probably can’t see the water loss in the cells, but it’s there. The good news is the effects of environmentally aging can be minimized through both preventative actions and treatment.

Hormonal Aging: Another Fact of Life12145582_1529962630629177_1482865733_n 

This type of aging has gain tremendous attention in recent years and has no doubt spurred much conversation, especially in women’s circles. Hormonal aging occurs as levels of estrogen decline –and starts happening long before menopause.

Estrogen is your skin’s best friend. It helps prevent aging in three big ways: 1. It prevents a decrease in skin collagen in postmenopausal women; 2. It increases the skins collagen content, which maintains skin thickness; and 3. It helps skin maintain moisture by promoting the production of certain substances in the skin that boost hydration.

Doctor Murad Article by Howard Murad, M.D., FAAD, a world renowned skincare expert and founder of the Inclusive Health movement. Read more about Dr. Murad.

Read More

Happy Holidays from Dr. Murad

Happy Holidays from Dr. Murad

One of the gentle pieces of advice I offer patients is to find beauty everywhere. It’s easy to lose focus on beauty when we allow ourselves to get caught up in gift-buying, cooking and other holiday joys that can become holiday chores. Take a moment to reset your perspective and take stock of the beauty in your life, and I promise it will bring you joy. Here are some of my favorite ways to find beauty:

Volunteer. Experience the joy of serving others by volunteering. Volunteering will give you new perspective and help you see the beauty in others.

Express Gratitude. The more you feel thanks for beautiful things, the more beautiful they appear to you and the more you cherish them.

Listen. Share meaningful conversations with close friends, rather than just
sending holiday cards.

The beauty you discover will add a little extra glow to your holiday season.

Wishing you the best of health,

 

Drs Sign Black

 

 

Howard Murad, M.D.
Dermatologist; pharmacist; holder of 19 dermatology-related patents; and author of Conquering Cultural Stress, Wrinkle-Free Forever, The Cellulite Solution and the acclaimed bestseller The Water Secret.

Read More

Foods, Fads and Facts. What’s Right for You?

BL15_646-FoodsFadsFactsDrMurad

Looking at the broad sweep of human history, we who are lucky enough to live in the developed world are surrounded by an unprecedented abundance of food and food choices. Freed from the struggle to find enough food to survive in our immediate environment, a struggle that has marked most of human existence, we have the luxury of declining to eat certain foods that our ancestors would have gladly eaten. This freedom from want allows us to make informed choices to improve the nutritional quality of our diet, but it has also fueled the demonization of foods like wheat and dairy that have long been valued as wholesome and the exaltation of foods like kale and quinoa, which have long lingered in comparative dietary obscurity.

So how are we to make the most of our food freedom when we are constantly bombarded with new revelations about heroes and villains lurking in our kitchens—only to have those revelations revealed in turn as the work of publicity seekers pedaling bad science?

Here are a few simple suggestions for making good food choices.

Don’t Make Any Sudden Moves
Radical shifts in your diet, or any other aspect of your life, are rarely a great idea. Unless a food or product is the subject of a recall because it is contaminated or unwholesome, you can generally continue to consume it while you are learning more about the pros and cons of including it in your diet.

Consider the Source
This is true both for the source of your food and the source of your information about food. The gold standard for both would be clean and ethically produced. If food is sourced from someplace where agricultural products are not inspected, there are no restrictions on the use of pesticides, and working conditions are unsafe and unsanitary, you probably shouldn’t consume it. Similarly, if food “science” comes from a “dirty” source with an economic or political interest in the “story,” you probably shouldn’t consume it either. While no single source of information is entirely reliable, the editorial standards for publication in established medical journals are fairly high and provide some level of screening to help filter out some of the junk science.

Look for Corroboration
Real science takes time—and generates results that can be repeated. A tremendous amount of research and peer review of that research is needed to start to tease out the truth about any subject. Many of the tantalizing or horrifying food stories that we read, especially those stories that bubble up in the unedited wilderness of the Internet, are based upon things suggested by early findings and small studies.

“Listen” to Your Body—and Your Doctor
Trust your experience. If something hasn’t bothered you in the past, it probably isn’t going to be a problem in the short term while you are deciding whether it is a good choice for you. Don’t forget that you are unique—from your smile to the curves of your digestive tract. If your best friend is one of the very small number of people who cannot tolerate gluten, that doesn’t mean your health will improve if you eliminate certain grains from your diet. But if you are experiencing some symptoms of a food allergy or intolerance, most often digestive and dermatological issues, it is important to talk to your doctor about how to identify a problem food and eliminate it from your diet.

Miracle Foods
Goji berries? Acai berries? Coconut water? Kale? Each of these foods is wonderful in its own way, but there are no magic berries, leaves, teas or juices that will change your life. All plant-based foods, in their whole, natural, unprocessed state, are truly miracle foods packed with antioxidants, vitamins and other healthful phytochemicals. Enjoy them in as fresh and unprocessed a state as you can, and enjoy them as a diverse assortment. Humans have evolved to be quite successful as omnivores, and we thrive on a varied diet. Dietary diversity really is key, because when it comes to foods, we really can have too much of a good thing—and the current kale craze provides an excellent example. Doctors are seeing people in their offices with digestive issues and symptoms of severe thyroid gland suppression as a result of obsessive over-consumption of kale.

Savor the Flavors of Life
No matter what food choices you make, don’t let food be one more source of stress and anxiety. Try to follow a simple 80/20 strategy to build the bulk of your diet; 80%, from whole foods with a special emphasis on colorful, water-rich fruits and vegetables and 20% from foods that you love, regardless of their inherent healthfulness. Sharing foods you love with those you love will give a bigger boost to the health of your heart than you’ll ever get from a bowl of chia seeds.

 

Doctor Murad Article by Howard Murad, M.D., FAAD, a world renowned skincare expert and founder of the Inclusive Health movement. Read more about Dr. Murad.

Read More